Resumes, CVs & Cover Letters

Your resume or CV is a concise, tailored summary of your skills and experiences, while your cover letter answers the question

Your resume or CV

Think of this as a marketing tool that shows that your product (you) meets the needs of your potential customer (the employer). It highlights education, experience, activities, and skills that relate to your career objectives and next move, whether that is a new job in your field, an internship, a promotion, a transition to a different area of work or re-entry into the marketplace.

View Our Guide to Building a Strategic Resume (PDF)

VMock — Online Resume Review Tool Available 24/7

 To give students and alumni more options to have their resumes reviewed and updated 24/7, the Block Career Center has partnered with the Virtual Resume Platform, VMock.  The platform provides instant personalized feedback on your resume based on criteria gathered from employers and the Block Career Center resume standards. 

Learn More and Access VMock

Your cover letter

If your resume or CV is the feature film, your cover letter is the trailer that piques the audience’s interest. Done well, your letter has the power to excite the reader and make the prospective employer even more interested in what your resume has to offer. Put simply, a cover letter explains why you are sending your resume. While resumes and CVs offer a big picture of your background and accomplishments, your cover letter includes only certain selling points, i.e., the ones that will resonate most with a specific employer. The most effective cover letters answer the question: How do I meet the employer’s requirements for this position?

Your resume/CV and cover letter alone will not get you hired, but they should give readers a solid understanding of your relevant academic and professional background and make them want to meet you and discuss your qualifications further in an interview.

In addition to showcasing your skills and experience, resumes, CVs, cover letters, and other self-marketing materials are samples of your writing skills and attention to detail. The grammar, punctuation, consistency and formatting must be flawless. We encourage you to have your documents reviewed by a Friedman School Block Career Center Advisor before sending them to potential employers.

Resume Keywords: What They Are and How to Use Them

There’s tons of advice about creating a resume that gets results. And one of the common topics is resume keywords. Most advice says using keywords on your resume is crucial. And it is. The right resume keywords can and do …

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5 Reasons You Should Write a Cover Letter—Even When the Job Description Says It’s Optional

We get it. Writing a cover letter for every application is hard. So when you come across the words “cover letter optional” on a job posting, you might feel a weight lift off of you. After all, your application just …

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How to Read a Job Description the Right Way—So You Can Stop Sending Resumes Into the Void

When’s the last time you read a job description? If you’re currently job hunting, your immediate answer might be something like “last night” or “a few minutes ago.” But ask yourself: When’s the last time you really read a job …

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5 Ways to Immediately Improve Your Resume

Your resume is your first opportunity to sell yourself to recruiters and hiring managers. It can also be your last if your resume is outdated or too thin. Here are five tips that will help you immediately update and beef up …

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Hard Skills vs. Soft Skills: What Are They and How Can You Show Them Off in Your Job Search?

There’s no way around it. In your job hunt, your skills matter. They tell potential employers not only what you can do, but how you can do it and even who you are. All your skills can generally be divided …

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Featured Resources

Schedule a Conversation with an Alumni Volunteer Today!

Featured Alumni engage in career conversations with current Friedman School students, i.e., …